Showing posts with label api. Show all posts
Showing posts with label api. Show all posts

Reading Notes #369

Cloud


Programming


Miscellaneous


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Reading Notes #361

MVIMG_20190110_075409_2Cloud



Programming



Miscellaneous



Books

ted-talk


TED Talks: The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking

Author: Chris J. Anderson

Fantastic book that covers a lot of topics related to presenting. It covers the before, during, and even the after very smartly. There are no recipes here and this is exactly what makes this book so great. A must.











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Reading Notes #352

Suggestion of the week


Cloud


Programming


Data


Miscellaneous


Books

  • The Personal MBA: Master the Art of Business (Josh Kaufman) - An interesting book that helps to get in the mood, get prepared, and maybe for some whom weren't sure yet about the idea of a personal MBA (compare to the regular one)... Help to start planning and get moving. This book isn't an one book miracle MBA certification, but most likely a really good way to understand the journey the reader is about to start. The complete list of books to achieve this adventure is constantly updated and is available online. 


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Reading Notes #348

IMG_20181016_073145

Cloud


Programming


Data


Miscellaneous


~enjoy!

Reading Notes #340

fan-out-fan-in

Cloud


Programming


Integration


Miscellaneous


Reading Notes #336

MSInspire2018

Cloud



Programming


Miscellaneous



Reading Notes #332

IMG_20180616_101111

Cloud


Programming


Books

  • [Invisible Ink: A Practical Guide to Building Stories That Resonate] (Brian McDonald)  - We all know it, a story is the element that will give that little plus to our post, and video. This short book explains how to really make an effective one talking about the not visual things...
    Really interesting.

    ISBN 0984178627 (ISBN13: 9780984178629)

Reading Notes #331

IMG_20180609_102403-EFFECTS

Cloud


Programming



Books



Miscellaneous



Reading Notes #319

kUz2asfCloud


Programming


Databases


Miscellaneous



Reading Notes #315

36145725596_6536a4f8aa_cSuggestion of the week



Cloud


Programming


Databases


Miscellaneous





Photo credit: nickpettican on Visual Hunt / CC BY-NC-ND

Reading Notes #314

MVIMG_20180204_102600Suggestion of the week

  • The Modern Dev Team (Rob Conery) - What a great post. Maybe it's only me getting old ;) but I think we all have these thoughts one day or the other.

Cloud


Programming


Databases

  • My Favorite SQL Prompt Features (MarlonRibunal) - If you never try SqlPrompt and you write SQL in your day to day, stop read this, and go downloading it, or at least read this post that gives you a glimpse of it's feature.

Miscellaneous


Reading Notes #312

IoT Hands-on Lab at Ottawa

Suggestion of the week


Cloud


Programming


Miscellaneous

How to Automatically Generate Video Sub-Title in Another Language

I recently started a French YouTube channel. Quickly, I got a message asking to add English sub-title, and got also a suggestion to leverage Azure Logic App and some Cognitive Services to help me in that task. I really liked the idea, so I gave it a shot. I recorded myself and in twenty minutes I was done. Even though, it was not the success I was hoping for, the application works perfectly. It's just that speaking in French with a lot of English technical word was a little bite too hard for the Video Indexer. However, If you are speaking only one language in your video that solution would work perfectly. In this post, I will show you how to create that Logic App with Azure Video Indexer and Cognitive Services.

The Idea


Once a video is dropped in an OneDrive folder (or any file system accessible from Azure), a Logic App will get triggered and uploads the file to the Azure Video Indexer, generate a Video Text Tracks (VTT) file, and save this new file in another folder. A second Logic App will get started and use the Translator Text API from Azure Cognitive Service to translate the VTT file, and save it into the final folder.

GenerateSubTitle


The Generation


Before getting started, you will need to create your Video Indexer API. To do this, login to the Video Indexer developer portal, and subscribe at the Video Indexer APIs - Production in the Product tab. You should then get your API keys.


ApiKeyPage

To get more detail on the subscription refer to the documentation. To know the names, parameters, code sample to all the methods available in your new API, click on APIs tab.

APIDetails

Now let's create our first Logic App. I always prefer to start with a blank template, but take what fits you. Any Online file system's trigger will do, in this case I'm using the When a file is created from OneDrive. I got some issue with the trigger. It was not always getting fired by a new file. I tried the When a file is modified trigger, but it didn't solve the problem. If you think, you know what I was doing wrong feel free to leave a comment :).

First reel action is to upload the file to the Azure Video Indexer. We can to that ery easily by using the method Upload video and and index, passing the name and content from the trigger.

Of course, the longer is the video the longer will be the process, so we will need to wait. A way to do that is by adding a waiting loop. Will use the method Get processing state from the Video Indexer and loop until the status is processed. To slow down your loop just add a wait action and set it at tree or five minutes.

When the file is completely processed, it will be time to retrieve the VTT file. This is done in two simple step. First, we will get the URL by calling the method Get the transcript URL, then with a simple HTTP GET we will download the file. The last thing we will need to do will be to save it in a folder where our second Logic App will be watching for new drop.

In the visual designer, the Logic App should look to this.

LogicAppGenerateVTT


The Translation


The second Logic App is very short. Once again, it will get triggered by a new file trigger in our OneDrive Folder. Then it will be time to call our Translator Text API from Azure Cognitive Service. That's to the great Logic App interface it's very intuitive to fill all the parameter for our call. Once we got the translation, we need to save it into our final destination.

The Logic App should look like this.

LogicAppTranslate


Conclusion


It was much easier than I expected. I really like implementing those integration projects with Logic App. It's so easy to "plug" all those APIs together with this interface. And yes like I mentioned in the introduction the result was not "great". I run test with video purely in English (even with my accent) or only in French (no mix) and the result was really good. So I think the problem is really the fact that I mix French and English. I could improve the Indexer by spending time providing files so the service could understand better my "Franglish". However, in twenty minutes, I'm really impressed by the way, in turned out. If you have idea on how to improve this solution, or if you have some questions, feel free to leave a comment. You can also watch my French YouTube video.

All the code is available online on Github - Cloud5VideoHelper.

References:



Reading Notes #303

logo-glyphSuggestion of the week

  • Writing tests in Postman (joyce) - With all the connected things and all the API in our system, this post shows a brilliant and simple way to test all those external calls.

Cloud


Programming


Data


Miscellaneous




Reading Notes #297

Jekyll_AppService

Suggestion of the week

  • How to uninstall Scrum (Erwin Verweij) - When you will read that post (because you must read it... Seriously), you will smile, giggle and maybe even laugh.


Cloud


Programming


Miscellaneous





Reading Notes #292

cloudheight


Suggestion of the week


Cloud


Programming


Databases


Miscellaneous



Reading Notes #283

June9Suggestion of the week


Cloud


Programming


Databases


Miscellaneous


Reading Notes #278

azure_functions_featured_imageCloud


Programming


Miscellaneous

  • Designing a Conversation (Alexandre Brisebois) - Interesting post that digs into the paradox where "us", humans have been communicated since our beginnings but still have trouble doing it, now we want to plan ahead and architect communication with machines.
  • Introduction to Microsoft To-Do (Gunnar Peipman) - Interesting app Microsoft finally did his ToDo service.



Reading Notes #275

IMG_20170409_152323Cloud


Programming


Miscellaneous



~Frank



Passing a file from an Azure Logic App to a Web API

(Ce billet en aussi disponible en français.)

Logic App is one of my favorite tools in my cloud toolbox. It's very easy to connect things together, something without even coding! Last week, I needed to pass a file from a SharePoint folder to an API. I moved files tons of times using Azure Logic Apps, but this time something was not working. Thanks to Jeff Hollan (@jeffhollan) who put me on the good path by giving me great advice, my problem was quickly solved. In this post, I will share with you the little things that make all the difference in this case.

The Goal


When a file is created in a SharePoint folder, an Azure Logic App needs to get triggered and passes the file name and its content to a Web Api. In this case, I'm using Sharepoint, but it will work the same way for all folder connector types (ex: DropBox, OneDrive, Box, GoogleDrive, etc.)

Note:
In this post, I'm using a SharePoint Online, but the same thing could perfectly work with a SharePoint on premise or in a Virtual machine. In this situation, On-premise Data Gateway needs to be installed locally. It's very easy to do, just follow the instruction. One gotcha... You MUST use the same Microsoft account of type "work or school" to connect to the Azre.portal.com and installing the On-premise Data Gateway.

The Web API App


Let's start by building our Web API. In Visual studio create a new Web API App. If you would like to have more details about how to create one see my previous post. Now, create a new controller and add a new function UploadNewFile with the following code:

[SwaggerOperation("UploadNewFile")]
[SwaggerResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK)]
[Route("api/UploadNewFile")]
[HttpPost]
public HttpResponseMessage UploadNewFile([FromUri] string fileName)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(fileName))
    {
        return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.NoContent, "No File Name.");
    }

    var filebytes = Request.Content.ReadAsByteArrayAsync();

    if (filebytes.Result == null || filebytes.Result.Length <= 0)
    {
        return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.NoContent, "No File Content.");
    }

    // Do what you need with the file.

    return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK);
}

The tag [FromUri] before the parameter is just a way to specify where that information is coming from. The content of the file couldn't be passed in the querystring, so it will be passed through the body of our HTTP Request. And it will be retrieved with the code Request.Content.ReadAsByteArrayAsync(). If everything works we return a HttpResponseMessage with the HttpStatusCode.OK otherwise some message about the problem. You can now publish your Wep API App.

In order to be able to see our WebAPI App from our Logic App, one more thing needs to be done. From the Azure portal, select the freshly deployed App Service and from the options section (the left area with all properties) select CORS, then type * and save it.

changeCORS

The Logic App


Assuming that you already have a SharePoint up and running, let's create the new Logic App. Once the Logic App is deployed click the edit button to go in the designer. Select the Blank template. In this post, I need a SharePoint trigger when a New File is created. At this point, you will be asked to answer a few questions in order to create your SharePoint connector. Once it's done select the folder where you will be "dropping" your files.

Now that the trigger is done, we will add our first (an only) action. Click Add Step. Select available functions, then our App Service and finally the method UploadNewFile.
SelectApiApp
Thanks to swagger, Logic App will be able to generate a parameter form for us. Put the filename in the Filename parameter textbox. The Logic App should look like this.

FullLogicApp

The last thing we need to do is specify to our Logic App to pass the file content to the body of the HTTP request to the API. Today, it's not possible to do it using the interface. As you probably know, behind that gorgeous sits a simple json document, and it's by editing this one that we will be able to specify how to pass the file content.

Switch to Code view, and find the step that calls our API App. Simply add "body": "@triggerBody()" to that node. That will tell Logic App to bind the body of the trigger (the file content) and pass-it to the body of our web request. The code should look like this:

"UploadNewFile": {
    "inputs": {
        "method": "post",
        "queries": {
        "fileName": "@{triggerOutputs()['headers']['x-ms-file-name']}"
        },
        "body": "@triggerBody()",
        "uri": "https://frankdemo.azurewebsites.net/api/UploadNewFile"
    },
    "metadata": {
        "apiDefinitionUrl": "https://frankdemo.azurewebsites.net/swagger/docs/v1",
        "swaggerSource": "website"
    },
    "runAfter": {},
    "type": "Http"
}

You can now save and exit the edit mode. The solution is ready, enjoy!

References: