Showing posts with label dotnetcore. Show all posts
Showing posts with label dotnetcore. Show all posts

Reading Notes #443

Reading Notes #443


Every Monday, I share my "reading notes". Those are a curated list of all the articles, blog posts, podcast episodes, and books that catch my interest during the week and that I found interesting. It's a mix of the actuality and what I consumed. 

You think you may have interesting content, share it!

Cloud

Programming

Podcast

Miscellaneous

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Reading Notes #431

Every Monday, I share my "reading notes". Those are a curated list of all the articles, blog posts, podcast episodes, and books that catch my interest during the week and that I found interesting.

It's a mix of the actuality and what I consumed.

You think you may have interesting content, share it!

Cloud

Programming

Databases

Miscellaneous

Reading Notes #421

Every Monday, I share my "reading notes". Those are the articles, blog posts, podcast episodes, and books that catch my interest during the week and that I found interesting.

It's a mix of the actuality and what I consumed. Enjoy!

Programming

  • Try gh, GitHub's new CLI (John Papa) - Oh, that's really nice I like that. I find it funny that t should like you just got a hit in the chest. However, it looks powerful enough to cut your breath... so it probably deserves it.

Podcasts

  • 0241 - Etienne Tremblay - GitHub Actions (Visual Studio Talk Show) - Great episode that compare, discuss, and speculate with GitHub Actions and Azure DevOps. It's in French. I miss you guys it's been too long... Great show.

Miscellaneous


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Reading Notes #419


Every Monday, I share my "reading notes". Those are the articles, blog posts, podcast episodes, and books that catch my interest during the week and that I found interesting.
It's a mix of the actuality and what I consumed. Enjoy!


Suggestion of the week

  • Approval Workflows With GitHub Actions (Aaron Powell) - Wow! That's a very clever and impressive way to have step flow in GitHub. All the details are in the post if you would like to create your own.

Cloud

Programming

Podcasts

Miscellaneous


Reading Notes #418


Every Monday, I share my "reading notes". Those are the articles, blog posts, podcast episodes, and books that catch my interest during the week and that I found interesting.
It's a mix of the actuality and what I consumed. Enjoy!

Cloud

Programming

Shameless plug

Podcasts

  • Des fonctions courtes, qui font une chose (Les Semi-Colons) - First time for me listening to this podcast, third time for them. A very interesting podcast in "Canadian French". They are passing through the book Clean Code of Robert C. Martin. This episode was about chapter 3.
  • vygl - Le balado Ep.17 (vygl) - Great podcast in French. It was my first try and I really liked it. We can ear the experience of the speaker in their voice but also by the quality of this audio.

Miscellaneous

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Reading Notes #414

Every Monday, I share my "reading notes". Those are the articles, blog posts, podcast episodes, and books that catch my interest during the week and that I found interesting. It's a mix of the actuality and what I consumed.

Cloud

Programming

Podcasts

  • 0240 - Anthony Giretti - Le protocole gRPC (Visual Studio Talk Show) - Nice episode where they talk about gRPC and gRPC web, where it comes from, why it's different than the previous version, and how it's possible to use it with .Net. All that in French!

Miscellaneous

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Reading Notes #411

Cloud

  • Azure CLI Kung-Fu Tips and Tricks (Dan Patrick) - A true story for a real warrior... This post explains how a well done Azure CLI script can save you in hard conditions.

Programming

Podcast

Reading Notes #410


Every Monday, I share my reading notes. Those are the articles, blog posts, podcast episodes, and books that catch my interest during the week and that I found interesting. It's a mix of the actuality and what I consumed.

Programming

Databases

Podcast

  • Myself: It's not weird at all (Hanselminutes - Fresh Talk and Tech for Developers) - I nice episode much longer than the usual, but the guest is also special... It's Scott. During a Live Stream on Twitch it the Live Coders... People suggest making a podcast episode of the interview... I couldn't agree more.
  • The Power of Humor in Tech with Chloe Condon (Screaming in the Cloud) - Very refreshing episode with the awesome and very colorful Chloe. Nice show that goes to fast. Very interesting discussion about the non-traditional way to technical work, and its success.

Reading Notes #408


Every Monday, I share my reading notes. Those are the articles, blog posts, podcast episodes, and books that catch my interest during the week and that I found interesting. It's a mix of the actuality and what I consumed.

Cloud

Programming

Miscellaneous


☁️

Reading Notes #407


Every Monday, I share my reading notes. Those are the articles, blog posts, podcast episodes, and books that catch my interest during the week and that I found interesting. It's a mix of the actuality and what I consumed.

Cloud

  • Generating Images with Azure Functions (Aaron Powell) - Brilliant usage of Azure function and its the first one I see in F#! All the code is available in GitHub, definitely worth the detour.

Programming

  • Use MongoDB in Your C# ASP.NET Apps (Terje Kolderup) - This is a very complete tutorial the shows all the code and explains step by step how to add, configure and use MongoDB.

Podcasts

  • SPI 401: Jesse Cole—The Yellow Tux Guy (Jesse Cole) - Wow! Great show, if you don't feel pumped up and 200% motivated after listening to this show... We might be in Zombieland already.... ­čśť.

Miscellaneous

  • Is that position available for remote? (Mark Downie) - A very interesting post that, I think, explains well the 'behind the scene' of the response we can get when asking the remote question.
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Reading Notes #406


Every week, I publish my reading notes. Those are the articles, blog posts, podcast episodes, and books that catch my interest and that I found interesting. It's a mix of the actuality and what I was looking for.

My Numbers for 2019

  • This marks the 46 Reading Notes blog post.
  • 20 blog posts in French or English. 
  • 69 live stream on Twitch
  • 33 Cloud 5 Minutes episode in French or English.
  • Many talks in different communities
  • 881 contributions in open-source projects

Looking forward to seeing you all in two days to start 2020 together!



Cloud

Programming

DevOps

Podcasts

Miscellaneous

  • Visualizing Your Work Schedule (Valentin Sawadski) - Interesting project.I'm always looking forward to the best way to track my time and see where I put my effort (aka time).

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Reading Notes #405


Every week, I publish my reading notes. Those are the articles, blog posts, podcast episodes, and books that catch my interest and that I found interesting. It's a mix of the actuality and what I was looking for. This one is the last of 2019!

Cloud


Programming


Miscellaneous

  • Advice to my 20 year old self (Scott Hanselman) - An Interesting post. But to be honest, the more I think about it the less I would spoil things. So as good or bad as it sounds, my advice would probably just be something like thrust yourself, you'll be fine.
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Deploy to Azure Directly From the Repository with GitHub Actions


You hear about that new GitHub Actions. Or maybe you didn't but would like to add a continuous integration, continuous deployment (CI-CD) to your web application. In this post, I will show you how to add a CI-CD to deploy automatically to Azure using the GitHub Actions.

What are GitHub Actions


GitHub Actions are automated workflows to do things. One of these could be a CI-CD. Using a workflow you could decide to compile and execute some unit tests at every push or pull request (PR). Another workflow could be that you deploy that application.

In this article, I will deploy a .Net Core application in Azure. However, you can use any languages you would like and deploy anywhere you like... I just needed to pick one :)

Now, let's get started.

Step 1 - The Code.


We need some code in a GitHub repo. Create a GitHub repo, clone it locally. And your app in it. I created mine with dotnet new blazorserver -n cloud5minsdemo -o src. Then commit and push.

Step 2 - Define the workflow


We got the code, now it's time to define our workflow. I will be providing all the code snippets required for the scenario cover in this post, but there is tons of template ready to be used available directly from your GitHub repository! Let's have a look. From your repository click on the Action tab, and voila!


When I wrote this post, a lot of available templates assumed the Azure resources already existed and you and adding a CI-CD to the mixt to automated your deployment. It's great but in my case, I was building a brand new web site so those didn't fit my needs. This is why I created my own template. The workflow I created was inspired by Azure/webapps-deploy. And there a lot of information also available on Deploy to App Service using GitHub Actions.

Let's add our template to our solution. GitHub will look in the folder .github/workflows/ from the root of the repository. Then create a file with the extension .yml

Here the code for my dotnet.yml, as any YAML file the secret is in the indentation as it is whitespace sensitive:

on: [push,pull_request]

env:
  AZURE_WEBAPP_NAME: cloud5minsdemo   # set this to your application's name
  AZURE_GROUP_NAME: cloud5mins2

jobs:
  build-and-deploy:
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:

    # checkout the repo
    - uses: actions/checkout@master
    
    - name: Setup .NET Core
      uses: actions/setup-dotnet@v1
      with:
        dotnet-version:  3.0.101


    # dotnet build and publish
    - name: Build with dotnet
      run: dotnet build ./src --configuration Release
    - name: dotnet publish 
      run: |
        dotnet publish ./src -c Release -o myapp 

    - uses: azure/login@v1
      with:
        creds: ${{ secrets.AZURE_CREDENTIALS }}

    - run: |
        az group create -n ${{ env.AZURE_GROUP_NAME }} -l eastus 
        az group deployment create -n ghaction -g ${{ env.AZURE_GROUP_NAME }} --template-file deployment/azuredepoy.json


    # deploy web app using Azure credentials
    - name: 'Azure webapp deploy'
      uses: azure/webapps-deploy@v1
      with:
        app-name: ${{ env.AZURE_WEBAPP_NAME }}
        package: './myapp' 

    # Azure logout 
    - name: logout
      run: |
        az logout


The Agent


There is a lot in there let's start by the first line. The on: is to define the trigger, in this case, the workflow will be trigger at every push or PR.

The env: is where you can declare variables. It's totally optional, but I think it will help then templates are more complex or simply to reuse them easily.

Then comes the jobs: definition. In this case, we will use the latest version of Ubuntu as our build agent. Of course, in a production environment, you should be more specify and select the OS that matches your needs. This job will have multiples steps defined in the, you guess it, steps: section/

We specify a branch to work with and set up our agent by:

uses: actions/setup-dotnet@v1
with:
  dotnet-version: 3.0.101

This is because I have a .Net Core project. For Node.js project, it would be

uses: actions/setup-node@v1
with:
  node-version: 10.x

And it would be a better idea to set the version as an environment variable to be able to change it quickly.

The next two instructions are really .Net Core focus as they will build and package the application into a folder myapp. Of course, in the "section" you could execute some unit test or any other validation that you may find useful.

The next section may be less obvious.

- uses: azure/login@v1
  with:
    creds: ${{ secrets.AZURE_CREDENTIALS }}

Access and Secrets


To have our GitHub Action to be able to create resources and deploy the code it needs to have access. The azure/login@v1 will let the Action login, using a Service Principal. In other words, we will create an authentication in the Azure Active Directory, with enough permission to do what we need.

Let's examine the following Azure CLI command:

`az ad sp create-for-rbac --name "c5m-Frankdemo" --role contributor --scopes /subscriptions/{subscription-id} --sdk-auth`

This will create a Service Principal named "c5m-Frankdemo" with the role "contributor" on the subscription specified. The role contributor can do mostly anything except granting permission.

Because no resources already existed the GitHub Action will require more permission. If you create the Resource Group outside of the CI-CD, you could limit the access only to this specific resource group. Using this command instead:

`az ad sp create-for-rbac --name "c5m-Frankdemo" --role contributor --scopes /subscriptions/{subscription-id}/resourceGroups/{resource-group} --sdk-auth`

The Azure CLI command will return a JSON. We will copy-paste this JSON into a GitHub secret. GitHub secrets encrypted secrets and allow you to store sensitive information, such as access tokens, in your repository. To access them go in the Settings of the repository and select Secrets from the left menu.


Click the Add a new secret button, and type AZURE_CREDENTIALS as the name. It could be anything, as long as you use that value in the YAML file describing the workflow. Put the JSON including the curly brackets in the Value textbox and click the save button.

Provisioning the Azure Resources


Now that the workflow has access we could execute some Azure CLI commands, but let's see what missing:

- run: |
    az group create -n ${{ env.AZURE_GROUP_NAME }} -l eastus 
    az group deployment create -n ghaction -g ${{ env.AZURE_GROUP_NAME }} --template-file deployment/azuredepoy.json --parameters myWebAppName=${{ env.AZURE_WEBAPP_NAME }}

The first command will create an Azure Resource Group, where all the resources will be created. The second one will deploy the website using an Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template. The --template-file deployment/azuredepoy.json tells us the template is a file named azuredeploy.json located in the folder deployment. Notice that the application name is passed to a parameter myWebAppName, using the environment variable.

An ARM template is simply a flat file that a lot like a JSON document. Use can use any text editor, I like doing mine with Visual Studio Code and two extensions: Azure Resource Manager Snippets, and Azure Resource Manager (ARM) Tools With those tools I can build ARM template very efficiently. For this template, we need a service plane and a web App. Here what the template looks like.

{
    "$schema": "https://schema.management.azure.com/schemas/2015-01-01/deploymentTemplate.json#",
    "contentVersion": "1.0.0.0",
    "parameters": {
        "myWebAppName": {
           "type": "string",
           "metadata": {
                "description": "WebAppName"
            }
        }
    },
    "variables": {},
    "resources": [
        {
            "name": "[parameters('myWebAppName')]",
            "type": "Microsoft.Web/sites",
            "apiVersion": "2016-08-01",
            "location": "[resourceGroup().location]",
            "tags": {
                "[concat('hidden-related:', resourceGroup().id, '/providers/Microsoft.Web/serverfarms/frankdemoplan')]": "Resource",
                "displayName": "[parameters('myWebAppName')]"
            },
            "dependsOn": [
                "[resourceId('Microsoft.Web/serverfarms', 'frankdemoplan')]"
            ],
            "properties": {
                "name": "[parameters('myWebAppName')]",
                "serverFarmId": "[resourceId('Microsoft.Web/serverfarms', 'frankdemoplan')]"
            }
        },
        {
            "name": "frankdemoplan",
            "type": "Microsoft.Web/serverfarms",
            "apiVersion": "2018-02-01",
            "location": "[resourceGroup().location]",
            "sku": {
                "name": "F1",
                "capacity": 1
            },
            "tags": {
                "displayName": "frankdemoplan"
            },
            "properties": {
                "name": "frankdemoplan"
            }
        }
    ],
    "outputs": {},
    "functions": []
}

This template is simple, it only contains the two required resources: a service plan, and a web app. To learn more about the ARM Template you can read my other post or check out this excellent introduction in the documentation.

Once the template is created and saved in its folder.

The deployment


There are only two last steps to the YAML file: the deployment and logout. Let's have a quick look at the deployment.

# deploy web app using Azure credentials
- name: 'Azure webapp deploy'
  uses: azure/webapps-deploy@v1
  with:
    app-name: ${{ env.AZURE_WEBAPP_NAME }}
    package: './myapp' 


Now that we are sure the resources exist in Azure we can deploy the code. This will be done with azure/webapps-deploy@v1 that will take the package generated by dotnet into myapp. Since we are already authenticated there is no need to specify anything at this point.

Everything is ready for the deployment. You just need to commit and push (into master) and the GitHub Action will be triggered. You can follow the deployment by going into the Actions tab.



After a few minutes, the website should be available in Azure. This post only shows a very simple build and deployment, but you can do so many things with those GitHub Actions, like executing tasks or packaging a container... I would love to know how you use them. Leave a comment or reach out on social media.


If you prefer, I also did a video of this post:



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Reading Notes #401

Cloud


Programming


Miscellaneous

Reading Notes #400

Cloud


Programming

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Reading Notes #396

Suggestion of the week

Programming

Miscellaneous

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Reading Notes #395


Cloud


Programming


  • New workflow editor for GitHub Actions (Chris Patterson) - Have you tested the new GitHub action? If yes you will be pleased with this new editor...Ending the research of that missing space somewhere.

Miscellaneous

  • What You Need for Effective Remote Work (William Gant) - This is a full chapter of an up coming book about remote workers... If you are new to this adventure and even more if you are fulltime remote, this read is a must.

Books




Author: Gretchen Rubin 

I really enjoyed this book. I found very interesting the categorization of all those habits and comportment grouping. I like also the habits association to help to break some or creating new ones. It's obvious, but I didn't think about it before.



Reading Notes #394


Suggestion of the week


Cloud


Programming

  • Moving from jQuery to Vue (Shawn Wildermuth) - An interesting post that explains Vue and gives references from a jQuery user...like me.

Reading Notes #391


Suggestion of the week

  • How to Use Github Professionally (Aaron Stannard) - This post is great! Tons of information and best practices (with an explanation of why its a best practice).

Cloud


Programming


Books

Living with the Monks: What Turning Off My Phone Taught Me about Happiness, Gratitude, and Focus 

Author: Jesse Itzler

I really enjoyed this book. Yes it's light and funny, but don't get fool, there is a deeper message here. I think Jessy wins his challenge by going into a monastery so we don't have to. We all have what it takes to live a more purposeful life, we just need to pause. Showdown, to go faster, do less to do more... Embrace the silence.



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Reading Notes #390


Suggestion of the week

Cloud

Programming

Podcasts

  • Economics of Kubernetes, with Owen Rog (Craig and Adam) - Really interesting episode. Of course all the news about Kubernetes were interesting, but even more the economics of cloud computing with the guess of the week, Owen Rog.

Miscellaneous